Brexit triumph: UK fishing communities to benefit from extra catch quota – ‘New horizon’

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Mr Buchan insisted leaving the European Union will give fishermen across the coastal UK new opportunities after years of EU regulation imposing strict catch quotas and regulating access to British water by other EU members’ vessels. The Scottish Seafood Association business manager said Brexit will pave the way to a more “optimistic” future thanks to an increase in fishing quotas. Speaking to BBC R5 Live, Mr Buchan said: “I do sympathise with everybody in this but we open the northeast of Scotland, we could possibly see this as an opportunity for our fishing communities, our fishermen and our processors.

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“Because of the constraints of the Common Fisheries Policy, which has not favoured the fishing communities, we see this as a new horizon for us to look optimistically at possible increases in quota.

“It’ll give fishermen more fish to land, the fish should be landed back in the UK, hoping the communities we serve right around the coast of the UK are the beneficiaries of any gain.”

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The Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) has long been a highly controversial aspect of British membership of the UK, with fishing communities across the country lamenting the rules forcing fishermen to throw extra fish back into the sea rather than being able to sell it. 

While the British Government has insisted Brexit will result in the end of CFP being in effect in the UK, Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon sparked outrage after it was suggested she may sign up to the policy once the UK leaves the bloc. 

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Ms Sturgeon has been determined to keep Scotland into the EU despite the UK voting to leave as a whole from the bloc but staying within the CFP could see the Scottish nation miss out on a huge business boost, according to pro-Brexit campaign Fishing for Leave.

A spokesman for the campaign said: “It’s not a question of if the EU takes Scotland’s fisheries but how much.

“The SNP is gifting the EU a second bite at robbing even more from our waters than the 60 percent they already do now – that would flatten what’s left of our once-thriving coastal communities.”

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They also warned that because fishing is has a “more significant” role to play in Scotland’s economy, rejoining the EU would “hurt Scotland’s economy more than the rest of the UK”.

Inside the European Union, member states commit to joining the CFP, which sets out the rules governing fishing across the bloc to manage fish stocks, fleets, and includes setting of quotas.

Brexiteer MP John Redwood has insisted gaining back full control of British waters will be one of the “big wins” from Brexit as he spoke to Express.co.uk.

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Mr Redwood said: “One of the big wins from leaving will be regaining control of our fishing grounds and seas around us. The Common Fishing Policy has dragged us from net exporter to net importer of fish.

“It has seen considerable damage done to our fishery by overfishing, with much of the wealth of our seas taken from us to sell elsewhere.

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“The damage has been intensified by the long period when the CFP forced fishermen to throw dead fish back into the sea, increasing the damage done without producing revenue for the industry and food for the consumer.”

The Conservative MP continued: “A domestic fishing policy must abandon the discards policy and insist on all fish caught being landed and sold. There will need to be controls on how much fish can be taken, with species analysis…. Continue reading article click below

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Brexit triumph: UK fishing communities to benefit from extra catch quota – ‘New horizon’

Mr Buchan insisted leaving the European Union will give fishermen across the coastal UK new opportunities after years of EU regulation imposing strict catch quotas and regulating access to British water by other EU members’ vessels. The Scottish Seafood Association business manager said Brexit will pave the way to a more “optimistic” future thanks to an increase in fishing quotas.

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